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John
05-07-06, 15:08
Recently, I took the opportunity to look through the viewfinder of a Canon 5D with a 17/40 mm L series lens fitted. I was surprised to notice considerable vignetting. Does anyone know if this is present on the actual sensor?

John.

Andy
05-07-06, 16:30
Recently, I took the opportunity to look through the viewfinder of a Canon 5D with a 17/40 mm L series lens fitted. I was surprised to notice considerable vignetting. Does anyone know if this is present on the actual sensor?

John.

I've certainly seen example shots from the 5D showing vignetting, but I haven't seen too many rants about it, so presumably it not a big issue to a lot of people.

John
05-07-06, 17:24
I've certainly seen example shots from the 5D showing vignetting, but I haven't seen too many rants about it, so presumably it not a big issue to a lot of people.

Thank you Andy.

John.

Leif
05-07-06, 19:11
Wide angle lenses usually vignette, especially wide open, and it can be quite severe e.g. 1 stop. So your experience is not unusual. But most people stop the lens down anyway, and that removes the effect. Even if vignetting is present, software can easily remove it, so it's not a big deal on digital.

I've also read many comments from people who suggest that full frame sensors can cause vignetting with wide angle lenses. The effect is supposed to result when light from the lens hits the sensor at an angle. Apparently the light does not hit the sensor directly, but rather it hits a layer of microlenses in front of the sensor. These are supposed to focus the light onto the sensor pits. But, if the light hits the microlenses at too steep an angle, it is lost. I don't know if this effect is real. Unfortunately there are too many bogus claims on the net to believe everything.

Leif

John
05-07-06, 19:25
Wide angle lenses usually vignette, especially wide open, and it can be quite severe e.g. 1 stop. So your experience is not unusual. But most people stop the lens down anyway, and that removes the effect. Even if vignetting is present, software can easily remove it, so it's not a big deal on digital.

I've also read many comments from people who suggest that full frame sensors can cause vignetting with wide angle lenses. The effect is supposed to result when light from the lens hits the sensor at an angle. Apparently the light does not hit the sensor directly, but rather it hits a layer of microlenses in front of the sensor. These are supposed to focus the light onto the sensor pits. But, if the light hits the microlenses at too steep an angle, it is lost. I don't know if this effect is real. Unfortunately there are too many bogus claims on the net to believe everything.

Leif

Thank you Leif. I was considering buying a 5D for general photography but keeping my 20D for bird pictures. Another option would be to go for a 1Ds which I believe has much faster focusing which would be good for flight shots. Its a lot to spend so I am letting my thoughts gell whilst looking around. Any comments from anyone would be very welcome.


John

Tannin
05-07-06, 22:53
One thing to bear in mind is that (for our purposes) the vignetting is caused by the lens, not the camera. Some lenses are known for it, others not.

John
06-07-06, 08:25
One thing to bear in mind is that (for our purposes) the vignetting is caused by the lens, not the camera. Some lenses are known for it, others not.

Thank you Tannin,

John

Chris West
10-08-06, 22:04
John,
Don't rule out the 5D for the vignetting issue.
I used to have a 1DS and for its time, was a great camera, but painfully slow.
I bought a 1D MkIIN and immediately realised what I was missing - WOW Super fast and great for birds and sports. Colours and quality excellent and outshine the 1DS.
Sold 1DS and 20D leaving 1DMKII but felt vulnerable not having a spare because I also shoot weddings. Took a long time taking the decision to buy the 5D as a 'Backup'!! Ha, Ha, Now the first camera I grab is the 5D.
The MkII only sees daylight when sports or birds is the requirement.
5D = Superb resolution, excellent contrast, great dynamic range etc etc.
1DMkII = 'Backup' Who'd have thought that?

Hope the info helps, you won't regret buying a 5D but get good glass!

Regards

Chris

John
11-08-06, 21:19
Thank you Chris for relating your experience. This is the direction I have been leaning towards as a result of reading reviews and you have clinched it for me. I will keep my 20D for birds and use the 5D for the rest of my photography. I don't take sport pictures. The lenses I have are Canon 17/40 f4 L, 24/105 f4/L and 100/400 f4/5.6 L. I think these meet the requirement of good glass. I will need to save a bit more before taking the plunge.

Kind regards,

John.

John,
Don't rule out the 5D for the vignetting issue.
I used to have a 1DS and for its time, was a great camera, but painfully slow.
I bought a 1D MkIIN and immediately realised what I was missing - WOW Super fast and great for birds and sports. Colours and quality excellent and outshine the 1DS.
Sold 1DS and 20D leaving 1DMKII but felt vulnerable not having a spare because I also shoot weddings. Took a long time taking the decision to buy the 5D as a 'Backup'!! Ha, Ha, Now the first camera I grab is the 5D.
The MkII only sees daylight when sports or birds is the requirement.
5D = Superb resolution, excellent contrast, great dynamic range etc etc.
1DMkII = 'Backup' Who'd have thought that?

Hope the info helps, you won't regret buying a 5D but get good glass!

Regards

Chris

miketoll
11-08-06, 21:43
There is supposed to be new Canon stuff coming out on 24th August so might be worth waiting to see whats announced. One website reported a Canon teaser of 'a legend has to start sometime'! New stuff may push the price of current gear down if its in the same market sector.

John
12-08-06, 07:04
Thanks for that info Mike.

John

There is supposed to be new Canon stuff coming out on 24th August so might be worth waiting to see whats announced. One website reported a Canon teaser of 'a legend has to start sometime'! New stuff may push the price of current gear down if its in the same market sector.

Chris West
12-08-06, 23:40
Agreed Mike, it would be wise to wait a few weeks.

John, I also have the 24/105 which rarely leaves the 5D - good lens.
I am also delighted to have a great example of the 100-400. In my opinion and based purely on my copy, the best Canon lens I have ever tried!

5D + 100-400 = superb combination.

Let us all know what decision you come to after the upcoming announcement.

Regards

Chris.

John
13-08-06, 18:01
Chris, I was a bit impetuous and bid 1170 for a new 5D on Ebay. I later regretted not waiting for the forthcoming announcment. In the event I was lucky I was outbid by 20. I am now waiting.

Kind rgards,

John

Agreed Mike, it would be wise to wait a few weeks.

John, I also have the 24/105 which rarely leaves the 5D - good lens.
I am also delighted to have a great example of the 100-400. In my opinion and based purely on my copy, the best Canon lens I have ever tried!

5D + 100-400 = superb combination.

Let us all know what decision you come to after the upcoming announcement.

Regards

Chris.

Wheeler
18-08-06, 07:22
Recently, I took the opportunity to look through the viewfinder of a Canon 5D with a 17/40 mm L series lens fitted. I was surprised to notice considerable vignetting. Does anyone know if this is present on the actual sensor?

John.

I've used this combination once and I didn't notice any vignetting. The 17-40 used to be my first choice for hangar/museum work but once I'd moved to full frame I found it far too wide so I now use a 24-105 (which I'm very happy with indeed). The 17-40 has sat in my bag unused since then.

John
18-08-06, 09:38
I've used this combination once and I didn't notice any vignetting. The 17-40 used to be my first choice for hangar/museum work but once I'd moved to full frame I found it far too wide so I now use a 24-105 (which I'm very happy with indeed). The 17-40 has sat in my bag unused since then.

Thanks for your comments. I think that, that is what will happen to my 17/40 too. I am not an ultra wide angle fan. I have recently taken an interest in photographing steam locomotives I don't think anything looks worse than an elongated boiler.

John.

Wheeler
18-08-06, 10:15
When I had a 10D as a backup/wide angle camera the 17-40 got used a great deal but I just didn't like the distortion with the 5D. I've considered selling it but I'm sure it'll come in handy sometime.

John
05-10-06, 16:49
Well I have finally aquired a 5D I haven't had chance to try it yet but will let you all know what I think , eventually. Thank you all for you helpful comments.

John