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View Full Version : Quick Exposure Test in PICTURE IT VER #7


nldunne
06-04-07, 17:59
Inacar ( I think you said you had P I Ver 7)

1) Go to FILE MENU and SAVE image to a BMP file
2) Go to FORMAT on top bar and RESIZE IMAGE to 1200 dpi at 4 X 3 inches.
3) Go to TOUCHUP on TOP MENU
a) Open - BRIGHTNESS/CONTRAST - Click - WHOLE PICTURE
- LEVELS AUTO FIX
b) Open - OTHER PHOTO REPAIR (AT BOTTOM
Click - RESTORE OLD PHOTO
- WHOLE PICTURE
- AUTO FIX
c) Open - ADJUST TINT - Click - WHOLE PICTURE
- TINT AUTO FIX
4) Go to FORMAT
a) Open - ROTATE - Correct only if needed
b) Open - RESIZE IMAGE - and set size to 72 dpi at 9 X 6 (it
show 6.75)
c) Open - CROP - and set in 9" and 6" and press ENTER.
move crop lines to desired position
around subject and click DONE
d) Open - RESIZE IMAGE - and set size to 9 X 6 or closest to
that
e) Click - FLOPPY ICON - to save image.
5) Go to FILE MENU - Click SAVE AS and save image to JPG file
for posting and saving file or...............

My image is a Grey Card image done this way.

Norm D

inacar
09-04-07, 00:52
Norm I love the colors. Nice & sharp. I will try your recipe to see how it goes. I appreciate your patience and ability to break it down into steps for us to follow. Thank you for sharing.

nldunne
09-04-07, 02:56
Inacar

I am glad to help where I can.

Like you, I feel this method has been as good with less hassle than my grey card I tried.

Also, I can include a grey card to see how my exposures are doing. My grey card came out very accurate in this image with Anne.

Best Wishes.

Norm D

nldunne
09-04-07, 10:32
Inacar and Group

Something just came to mind.

For those interested - by using the high dpi numbers in processing files..

The higher dpi number you use, the smaller the part of the image you can crop out of a cluttered or rotated image and keep good sharpness for a 9 X 6 file. This is if you have good sharpness in the original image.

Norm D

nldunne
20-04-07, 18:47
Inacar

I tried following the procedure of working up an image going by my online manual.

This is basically the order how I used each tool.

1. I saved a work copy to PNG (default work file) for PICTURE IT Ver 7.
2. Then I set my working size to 300 dpi at 12 X 9. My online manual gave
me an option of 600 dpi too, but passed on it. This is done in FORMAT
3. I checked for rotation correction.
4. I cropped the image until I got my choice of composition at 12 X 8
(working size).
5. Then I went to BRIGHTNESS/CONTRAST and chose which AUTO FIX
worked best.
6. Next I went to TINT and clicked on all white areas in the image until I
felt the image had good clean whites.
7. HUE/SATURATION is next. I clicked on different colours to see how they
could by improved.
8. SHARPEN follows. In this I magnified the canvas to 600 to 800% and
worked the slider switch from -(minus) 6 to 0 paying very close
attention to noise.
9. I SAVED all the work as I went along.
10. FORMAT is next and I reset my image to 300 at 9 x 6.
11. Then I reset the image to 72 at 9 X 6.
12 Next came SAVE AS in the FILE MENU and a save to JPG at 72 at 9 X 6
for posting.

Below is an example done by this. I was surprised at how much more shadow detail I could bring out compared to my earlier version. This is especially true of the streamers behind the yellow "kite" object in the upper left side.

To get the best from this exercise, sit back at the same ratio of chair to screen as you would sit back in the National Gallery in London to view a painting..

Norm D

nldunne
21-04-07, 01:32
Inacar and P I users

When I went through this image as per notes directly above, I clicked on almost every different area of this image.

For large areas, I made the image small in size for clicking a large area and for small areas, I made it large to pick up small areas and clicked on those. What amazed me was - to the right of the tree on Anne's right cheek, I can see shadow on the grass that looks like where the ground may be uneven or something - as there is no sun to create shadow.

When I finished, I was amazed at what I had brought out. This technique reminded me of an artist putting in strokes, sitting back and checking it, putting in another stroke or two and checking those until he was finished.

Norm D