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Lenses Discussion of Lenses

Ins and Outs of the Nikon Lens Mount.

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  #21  
Old 21-12-10, 19:17
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Default

Thanks Don
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primarily using Nikon film and digi kit, and some micro 4/3rds gear for experimenting with old lenses
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  #22  
Old 07-01-11, 17:19
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Default Lenses with built in motor ID

Well I have seen one thread and I guess there may be more to come, where members are looking at replacing their D50/D70/D100 cameras with newer versions, thereby begging the question of lens compatability.

Most users probably have older lenses that require screwdrive to autofocus, and that does raise a compatability issue with the lower end modern cameras. As these are built down to a pricepoint the coreless in body motor to drive AF/AFD lenses has been omitted on a few models.

So time to refresh the compatability list. As of Jan 1st 2011 the following cameras will not autofocus screw drive lenses, and so WILL REQUIRE LENSES WITH a built in motor.
D40, D40X, D60, D3000, D3100, D5000

To help anybody identify if their existing lens has a built in motor or not, I have added a graphic comparing an AFS (built in motor) lens with an AFD (screwdrive) lens.
A second graphic shows the location of the screw drive on the camera body for those that can get a hands on test at a camera in a shop.

Don
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File Type: jpg AFS_AFD indentification.jpg (153.9 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg Body lens mount.jpg (134.3 KB, 2 views)
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  #23  
Old 07-01-11, 17:24
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Default AI/AIS lens markings explained

With the introduction of the D7000 and its ability to meter with AI/AIS lenses the number of digital cameras capable using these lenses will grow. In fact with the introduction of movie ability then add a Follow Focus and you have the perfect setup as a/f is not used in those circumstances. Given that there are lots of these on the second hand market, and they make an attractive purchase in cases where autofocus is not a prime requirement. I thought it worth posting an explanitory.
In terms of image quality, these lenses are in a lot of cases well up there with even the latest a/f offerings, and I use a range of AIS lenses for most of my photo's.

This post is really intended for those who have only had experience of AFS lenses which have no seperate aperture control or depth of field scales, so would be unfamiliar with what they are looking at.

Other than the depth of field scale the most obvious other stand marking is a smaller secondary engraving of the aperture scale. This is of no consequence on DSLR's as once the camera is programmed for a specific lens, the aperture will be displayed electronically. However in cameras made before 2000 the only way of relaying aperture info into the viewfinder was by directly reading this smaller aperture scale though a window at the bottom front of the camera prism. I will do a seperate post covering this feature.

Another obvious physical difference is the 'rabbit ears' screwed to the aperture ring. This is a feature to give compatability with early metering systems on cameras such as the Nikon F, Nikkormat's and and Nikkormat EL's, and was dropped on the introduction of the first autofocus lenses.

Don
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File Type: jpg Manual focus lens markings.jpg (191.3 KB, 5 views)
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  #24  
Old 07-01-11, 17:27
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Default ADR ( Aperture Direct Readout )

With Jim looking at film 35mm cameras, and as I have one, a few weeks ago I checked out an F2AS for him.

As over the years I progressively graduated from no finder info and no through the lens metering to the current everything included. So it was natural to wonder how Jim would get on with much less than what he gets from his D200 which he is most used to. I thought of this thread then as before the F6 with its display is similar to a digital camera, viewfinder aperture display was by direct viewing of the secondary Aperture Direct Readout (ADR) scale on the lens.

As they say a picture is worth a thousand words, so its easier to explain Aperture Direct Readout (ADR) by posting here with a couple of graphics.

With the exception of the F2 Photomic (DP1 prism), F2S (DP2 prism), F2SB (DP3 prism) where an expensive mechanical coupling was included in the prisms, aperture is not displayed in the viewfinder of any camera using the Pre AI metering system.

In 1977 Nikon introduced Auto Indexing of the lens with the camera's meter, and took advantage of this by adding a window to the prisms of cameras to read and display aperture directly from a secondary engraved scale on the lens. To maintain backwards compatability it was necessary to retain the PreAI meter coupling shoe, but holes were added to it to increase the light reaching the ADR scale. This is fine in good light, but in low light the viewfinde aperture scale can be hard or impossible to see. This is not really a problem as in low light the lens would probably be wide open and even at a couple of stops down its easy to count the clicks as the lens is stopped down. Additional to the AI/AIS range of lenses Nikon introduced the lower cost Series E lenses which were
aimed at users of the new lower cost range of cameras such as the EM and FG.

Viewfinder illumination for low light use, where fitted tended to illuminate the shutter speed only. These were a press and hold the button down to light the bulb type, rather than being on while the shutter button is partially depressed.

Autofocus cameras using cpu chipped lenses changed viewfinder info to what we are used to today. However even the F4 and F5 still use the ADR method with AI/AIS lenses, and this did not change until the F6 and D series which allow for programming an AI/AIS lens so the display is the familiar electronic one.

Autofocus lenses lost the meter coupling shoe so only retained backwards compatability with cameras employing the Auto Indexing system. But as Nikon were still making the most popular AIS lenses until 2005, and the used market had lots of them both camps were and still are well supported.

In the graphic I have used an F3HP as the prism has greater overhang than the F2 so it gives a clearer explanation.

Don
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ADR lens explanation.jpg (236.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg ADR camera explanation.jpg (183.6 KB, 8 views)
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